Industrial Marketing 101: Using the Right Keywords

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Doing the research and developing the right keywords is what makes industrial marketing work.

You could have the Mona Lisa of industrial products, but if you can’t be found in the top search engine results, you may as well not even exist.

Sure, you can cut corners, search for the “magic bullet” or use Pay-Per-Click to get ahead in the eyes of Google and Bing. You could even turn to unscrupulous “black hat” tactics that can provide short-term industrial marketing gain.

I’ll admit, making a long-term commitment to optimization can at first be a daunting task, but it is worth it. Do a Google search for industrial marketing – there we are there at #5. Yup, it is worth it.

The Basics

Marketing has been, and likely will continue to be, filled with people, programs, marketing firms and SEO “gurus” that all claim to have the magic bullet that gets your company to the top of the Google search rankings.

So what’s an industrial marketing professional to do? No magic formula here. Choose your  keywords carefully and stick with them.

Though keywords used to be more heavily weighted in search algorithms, those days are long gone. But developing keywords to incorporate into your website copy and the rest of your online content still pays off by giving direction to your content.

Google’s search algorithm changes frequently, so one SEO tactic may be the flavor of the week one week and chopped liver the next. But by identifying long-term strategies for your content, you will find consistency in your messaging.

Optimize Your Business, Not Just Your Search

Optimizing your business doesn’t mean simply changing a few words around. It means developing a coherent and consistent strategy for incorporating the terms that your potential customers are searching for.

Part of this process involves minor changes like terminology (are you making pulleys or sheaves?). Such a change may seem trivial, but odds are a lot more buyers are searching for “pulleys” than “sheaves.”

A larger part of the process involves restructuring the blend of products offered by your company. If one of the products you make is searched for twice as often on the internet than any other product, you should be striving to sell more of that product.

You’re optimizing your process. Making more of what you can effectively sell. This is the new way to perform industrial marketing. Google search volume shouldn’t dictate the direction of your business in and of itself, but it should be a factor in how you approach optimizing your business.

Photo credit: arbyreed via photopin cc

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